Posts tagged ‘Occupational Therapy’

The Days I Grew Up

As an Occupational Therapist I have worked in several different settings. For the past 7 years I have worked in Home Health, where I go to peoples’ houses to treat them when they are not sick enough to be in a hospital or a nursing home, but it would be too difficult to bring them to an Outpatient Rehab place. For a few years before that, when I lived in Tampa, I worked as a Rehab Manager for an Outpatient Place (I usually refer to them as “Their Name – That Horrible Company” – they’re the ones who demoted me on my birthday and then fired me 8 days later. I later found out that the official reason they let me go was downsizing but instead of saying that that I was downsized, they preferred to tell me that I didn’t have what it took. B@stards. Oh, and by the way, I got a new job 20 hours later. Take THAT, motherf*ckers! But I digress.). When I lived in Staten Island, I worked full-time on a Psychiatry unit of a local hospital for 11 years and for 5 of those years I also worked on an “as needed” basis, at a Home Health company. However none of those sorts of jobs were ever in my original career goals. Nope, not even close. Originally, from when I was 13 years old and decided to be an O.T., until I was almost done with college, I was going to work in Pediatrics.

But something went terribly, terribly wrong.

It took years before I was comfortable telling this story but when I was Read more…

I’ve Fallen & I Can’t Get Up!

One of my new patients, “Esther,” broke her hip for the second time, about a year and a half ago. She wound up in a nursing home but somewhere along the lines they didn’t take as good care of her as they should have and she wound up with Read more…

Helping “Mr. Happy”

Although the prerequisites of becoming an Occupational Therapist have changed in the 20-someodd years since I was in school, one of the things that I believe all OT students are required to do at some point or another is complete a series of internships – spending “X” amount of time working in places where you can do almost everything that a full-fledged OT does but (at least when I went to school) it’s unpaid (actually, each internship counted as a 3-credit course for me – so I got to pay for this) and, of course, Read more…

“Pamelia”

“Pamelia” was one of those patients that we’d see on the Psych unit many times over. She was somewhere in her 50’s and lived in a Home For Adults in New York – a large “group home” sort of place where some people with mental illness lived because Read more…

Repeat Patient

I don’t remember his name but I remember exactly where his house is, every time I go past it. I remember hearing he was a healthy guy in these golden years of his life and that he was still active on the tennis court, even while he was in his mid-80’s. In fact, it was a tennis match that was Read more…

The Gloria Bow

It was Thanksgiving weekend so to stay with plan/tradition, Joe “let” me put the Christmas tree up (read: he puts it up and I help because it’s 9′ tall and I’m only slightly more than half of that and it’s just too big for me to handle). Tradition dictates that the ornaments may or may not go up on the same day to tree is assembled – in fact, this year they did not – but whenever I start hanging them (except for the ones at the top 2 feet of the tree, which I can’t reach even with my step stool…again, a “Joe job”. If you look closely, you can even see a line between what I’ve done and where he takes over), I know Read more…

Out of the Mouths of Babes. Not.

This post has some bad words in it. Mainly slang terms but still and all, they’re bad words that generally don’t get used in mixed company. So if you’re at work or have children nearby or just don’t like reading that sort of stuff, consider this fair warning to not continue reading at this time. 😉

If there’s one thing you can’t say about my job, it’s that it’s boring. Different patients, different personalities, different diagnoses, different abilities and problem areas, you name it and every day is an adventure. Some days and some patients are more challenging than others, but at least it’s always different. Sometimes the differences can surprise the hell out of you – especially when the patients say stuff that you just DON’T expect “cute little old ladies and men” to say. Read more…